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If you are 55 to 90 years of age you may be able to participate. Participation is free and no medication is involved.

Read More from the ADNI Principal Investigator, Dr. Michael W. Weiner

Watch the video about participation.

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About ADNI

The Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) is a longitudinal multicenter study designed to develop clinical, imaging, genetic, and biochemical biomarkers for the early detection and tracking of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Since its launch more than a decade ago, the landmark public-private partnership has made major contributions to AD research, enabling the sharing of data between researchers around the world.

Three overarching goals of the ADNI study are:

  1. To detect AD at the earliest possible stage (pre-dementia) and identify ways to track the disease’s progression with biomarkers.
  2. To support advances in AD intervention, prevention, and treatment through the application of new diagnostic methods at the earliest possible stages (when intervention may be most effective).
  3. To continually administer ADNI’s innovative data-access policy, which provides all data without embargo to all scientists in the world.
HISTORY

ADNI began in 2004 under the leadership of Dr. Michael W. Weiner, funded as a private-public partnership with $27 million contributed by 20 companies and two foundations through the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health and $40 million from the National Institute on Aging. The initial five-year study (ADNI-1) was extended by two years in 2009 by a Grand Opportunities grant  (ADNI-GO), and in 2011 and 2016 by further competitive renewals of the ADNI-1 grant (ADNI-2, and ADNI-3, respectively). Learn more about each phase of the study in the table below.

New participants were recruited across North America during each phase of the study and agreed to complete a variety of imaging and clinical assessments. Participants are followed and reassessed over time to track the pathology of the disease as it progresses. Results are then shared by ADNI through the USC Laboratory of Neuro Imaging’s Image and Data Archive (IDA). Learn more about each phase of the study in the table below.

 

 

Study characteristics ADNI-1 ADNI-GO
(Grand Opportunities)
ADNI-2 ADNI-3
Primary goal Develop biomarkers as outcome measures for clinical trials Examine biomarkers in earlier stages of disease Develop biomarkers as predictors of cognitive decline, and as outcome measures Study the use of tau PET and functional imaging techniques in clinical trials
Funding $40 million federal (NIA), $27 million industry and foundation $24 million American Recovery Act funds $40 million federal (NIA), $27 million industry and foundation $ 40 million federal (NIA), up to $20 million industry and foundation
Duration/start date 5 years/October 2004 2 years/September 2009 5 years/September 2011 5 years/September 2016
Cohort 200 elderly controls

400 MCI

200 AD

Existing ADNI-1  +

200 early MCI
Existing ADNI-1 and ADNI-GO +

150 elderly controls100 early MCI

150 late MCI

150 AD

Existing ADNI-1, ADNI-GO, ADNI-2 +

133 elderly controls

151 MCI

87 AD

ADNI 1

The first phase of ADNI launched in October 2004 with a 6-year, $67 million contributions from the National Institute on Aging, 13 pharmaceutical companies and two foundations. Originally designed to find more sensitive and accurate biomarkers for the early detection and tracking of AD, the ADNI1 study gathered and analyzed thousands of brain scans, genetic profiles, and blood and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers.

The study included 400 subjects diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), 200 subjects with the early AD, and 200 elderly control subjects.

As with all ADNI phases, ADNI1 researchers used brain imaging measures including structural MRI and PET (both FDG-PET, which measures glucose metabolism in the brain, and a pilot study using amyloid PET using a radioactive compound—Pittsburgh Compound B—which measures brain amyloid accumulation).

Further Reading

ADNI GO

ADNI was extended in 2009 during the ADNI GO phase, which assessed the existing ADNI1 cohort along with 200 new participants with early mild cognitive impairment (EMCI). The objective of this phase was to examine biomarkers at an earlier stage of the disease. MR protocols were also adjusted in the ADNI GO phase.

Further Reading

ADNI2

In 2011, ADNI2 began with an additional $67 million in funding, assessing participants from the ADNI1/ADNI GO phases in addition to the following new participant groups: 150 elderly controls, 100 EMCI subjects, 150 late mild cognitive impairment (LMCI) subjects, and 150 mild AD patients. A new cohort, Significant Memory Concern (SMC), was also added in ADNI2 to address the gap between healthy controls and MCI; a key inclusion criteria is a self-reported significant memory concern from the participant. The study included 107 SMC subjects. A major addition to ADNI2 was the addition of amyloid PET with Florbetapir at all ADNI2 sites and on all ADNI2 and ADNI GO subjects.

Further Reading

ADNI 3

ADNI3 began in 2016, with an expanded goal of determining the relationships between the clinical, cognitive, imaging, genetic, and biochemical biomarker characteristics across the entire spectrum of AD. ADNI3 adds brain scans that detect tau protein tangles (tau PET), a key indicator of the disease. This phase also continues the discovery, optimization, standardization, and validation of clinical trial measures and biomarkers used in AD research.

ADNI3 includes scientists at 59 research centers in the United States and Canada and will add hundreds of new MCI subjects, mild AD subjects, and elderly controls.

Further Reading

Centers and Cores

Industry Scientific Advisory Board

ADNI is governed by a Steering Committee comprised of the PI, all funded Core leaders, all site PIs, representatives of the NIH and FDA, and representatives of the companies contributing funding (observers only). Together with the Executive Committee and the Industry Scientific Advisory Board, these bodies ensure that the ADNI project adheres to the study design and methodology laid out in the grant submission.

Achieving the aims of the ADNI study would not be possible without the collaboration of hundreds of researchers, staff, industry advisors and research volunteers.

Coordination Center

The Coordination Center currently provides data management support for each protocol, including the generation of case report forms, site training, data collection and quality control, study tracking, interim reporting to the Data and Safety Monitoring Board (DSMB), progress reports to the NIH and ongoing daily support to the PI and project directors. Data collection and quality control are managed online. Reported data include: enrollment statistics, demographics, and clinical and cognitive evaluations.

contact

Neuropathology Core

Principal Investigator
John C. Morris, M.D.
Washington University
contact

 

The Neuropathology Core FRCPath, directed by John C. Morris, M.D. and co-directed by Nigel Cairns, Ph.D., follows the following guiding principles:

  • Neuropathological examination is essential to validate the clinical diagnoses in the ADNI study groups;
  • Variability in methods and interpretation of lesions among individual neuropathologists requires a central laboratory, using state-of-the-art methods and up-to-date criteria to establish uniform and standard neuropathological diagnoses;
  • Clinical-neuroimaging-neuropathological correlations in any ADNI participant who comes to autopsy will be of exceptional value; and
  • The archiving of fixed and frozen brain tissue will facilitate biomarker studies of the earliest stages of AD.

Dr. John Morris is a member of the Alzheimer’s Association’s Medical & Scientific Advisory Committee. He chairs the Clinical Task Force for the NIA’s Alzheimer Disease Centers program. He is author or co-author of over 300 peer-reviewed journal articles and 50 chapters and reviews. He edited the first and second editions of the Handbook of Dementing Illnesses.

Resources

Further Neuropathology Core documents can be found on the Study Documents page.

PET Core

Principal Investigator
William Jagust, M.D. 
University of California, Berkeley
contact

 

The PET Core is responsible for all aspects of PET images including PET acquisition at all performance sites, site qualification, QA and QC of all PET data, tracking all PET data acquisition and processing, and performance of all PET data processing.

Dr. William Jagust has used brain imaging, including PET, to investigate glucose metabolism in patients with AD. His work has included FDG-PET, structural MRI, functional MRI, and most recently amyloid imaging with PET. His laboratory was the first to describe Alzheimer’s-related hippocampal atrophy quantified with MRI, and has continued to pioneer approaches using multimodal imaging to study aging and dementia.

MRI Core

Principal Investigator
Clifford Jack, M.D.
Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota
contact

 

The MRI Core is responsible for all aspects of MRI images, including determining specific MRI pulse sequences, site qualification, QA and QC of all MRI data, tracking all MRI data acquisition and processing, and performance of all MRI data processing.

The MRI Core will also utilize an array of publicly available ADNI data, including neuropsychological test results, genotyping, MRI morphometry and other biomarkers to investigate brain-behavior relationships in older adults with and without cognitive impairment. By examining various data, the MRI Core aims to identify patterns of cognitive test performance in groups at increased risk for cognitive decline and investigate the association between these profiles and structural measures of brain volume and cortical thickness.

Resources

Clifford Jack is a highly prominent neuroradiologist in the AD field. His major contributions have been describing changes in hippocampal volume in AD and MCI compared with elderly controls, describing the rates of change in these populations, and correlating these changes with cognition and the transition to MCI and AD.

Further MRI Core documents can be found on the Study Documents page.

Genetics Core

Principal Investigator
Andrew J. Saykin, Psy.D.
Indiana University
contact

 

The Genetics Core is responsible for preparing genetic data, including for extracting planned and novel MRI and PET endophenotypes for use in whole genome association analyses. In addition to planned analyses (e.g., hippocampal atrophy), the core employs pattern recognition tools to extract novel phenotypic information.

Dr. Saykin joined the Indiana University School of Medicine faculty in November 2006 as director of a new transdisciplinary center of excellence in neuroimaging. His own NIH- and foundation-sponsored research program focuses on the use of brain imaging and genomic methods to study mechanisms of memory dysfunction and treatment response in neurological and psychiatric disorders.

Genetics Core documents can be found on the Study Documents page.

Clinical Core

Principal Investigator
Paul Aisen, M.D.
University of Southern California
contact

 
 

Principal Investigator
Ronald Petersen M.D., Ph.D.
Mayo Clinic
contact

 

The Clinical Core/Coordinating Center for ADNI3, based at the Alzheimer’s Therapeutic Research Institute (ATRI) at USC, manages the day-to-day clinical operations of ADNI. The Clinical Core oversees ADNI3 clinical activities, contracts with all sites, data management (including creation and management of the ADNI portal in the electronic data capture system for digital upload of all data from clinical sites), tracking and quality control, recruitment and retention of participants, regulatory oversight, financial management of site costs, safety monitoring (including DSMB reporting), and creation of a final “locked dataset” of all data at the close of the study.

Dr. Paul Aisen is a Professor of Neurology and Director of the Alzheimer’s Therapeutic Research Institute at the University of Southern California. The mission of ATRI is to advance the development of new treatment for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) through innovation in clinical trials.

Dr. Ronald Petersen is a Professor of Neurology Director of the Mayo Clinic’s Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center and the Mayo Clinic Study of Aging. He has carried out extensive studies in subjects transitioning from cognitively unimpaired to mild cognitive impairment and dementia. He and his colleagues work on biomarkers and cognition in aging.

Resources

Further Clinical Core documents can be found on the Study Documents page.

Biostatistics Core

Principal Investigator
Laurel Beckett, Ph.D.
University of California, Davis
contact

 

The Biostatistics Core is directed by Dr. Laurel Beckett, Ph.D., at UC Davis (UCD) and consists of biostatisticians based at UCD and USC. The Biostatistics Core provides specific expertise related to the ADNI data, including navigating the database, changes in data acquisition across the phases of ADNI, and working with the data files. This core interacts with biostatisticians and other quantitative researchers from academia and industry who are interested in ADNI data. In addition, the core develops multivariate statistical methods and conducts analyses utilizing data that span the ADNI cores.

Laurel Beckett has been involved in AD research for many years. She was the biostatistician for the East Boston AD studies that first estimated the population prevalence and incidence of AD and projected those numbers to the US population. Her methodological research in longitudinal studies and population-based studies has helped to describe patterns and correlates of clinical decline, both in AD and in the general population.

Resources
References
  1. Beckett LA, Harvey DJ, Gamst A, Donohue M, Kornak J, Zhang H, Kuo JH; and the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative. The Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative: Annual change in biomarkers and clinical outcomes. Alzheimer’s and Dementia (2010);6:257-264.  PMCID: PMC2867839
  2. Wyman BT, Harvey DJ, Crawford K, Bernstein MA, Carmichael O, Cole PE, Crane PK, DeCarli C, Fox NC, Gunter JL, Hill D, Killiany RJ, Pachai C, Schwarz AJ, Schuff N, Senjem ML, Suhy J, Thompson PM, Weiner M, Jack CR Jr. Standardization of analysis sets for reporting results from ADNI MRI data.  Alzheimers and Dementia (2013);9:332-337. PMCID: PMC3891834
  3. Donohue MC, Sperling RA, Salmon DP, Rentz DM, Raman R, Thomas RG, Weiner M, Aisen PS; Australian Imaging, Biomarkers, and Lifestyle Flagship Study of Ageing; Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative; Alzheimer’s Disease Cooperative Study. The preclinical Alzheimer cognitive composite; measuring amyloid-related decline. JAMA Neurology (2014);71:961-970. PMCID: PMC4439182
  4. Beckett LA, Donohue MC, Wang C, Aisen P, Harvey DJ, Saito N; Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative. The Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative phase 2: increasing the length, breadth, and depth of our understanding. Alzheimers & Dementia (2015);11:823-  831. PMCID:PMC4510463
Administrative Core

Principal Investigator
Michael W. Weiner, M.D.
UCSF, NCIRE, VA Medical Center
contact

 

The Administrative Core oversees all aspects of ADNI, including monitoring all financial and budgetary aspects of the project.

Michael W. Weiner has performed research for over 50 years. He is a Professor of Radiology, Medicine, Psychiatry, and Neurology at the University of California San Francisco (UCSF). He was a Veterans Affairs (VA) Research Associate and VA Clinical investigator and has also worked at VAs in Madison, WI, Palo Alto, CA, and now in San Francisco for the past 37 years where he established the Center for Imaging of Neurodegenerative Diseases (CIND) and is the Director Emeritus. Dr. Weiner was one of the first scientists to perform NMR on an intact animal and has used MRI/MRS for clinical research since 1984. Since 1988, he has focused on neurodegenerative diseases, particularly Alzheimer’s disease. Dr. Weiner has published over 900 peer-reviewed papers.

He is the founder of and PI of the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI), three Department of Defense ADNI grants (concerning the relationship of PTSD and TBI to AD), among other projects and is the founder of the Brain Health Registry. Dr. Weiner is a participant in ADNI at UCSF and has undergone all ADNI procedures (including lumbar punctures) longitudinally since the onset of the project 13 years ago.  He oversees all aspects of the ADNI project and directs each stage of the investigation.  He works closely with the core leaders, the various members of the scientific team, and the NIA Program Administrator. Dr. Weiner leads the ADNI Executive Committee teleconferences, attends the ADNI Clinical Core teleconferences, and often joins other ADNI Core meetings. He leads the ADNI Steering Committee meeting and attends all Scientific Advisory Board Meetings and is responsible for lending direction to all projects within this Initiative, based on input received by the Private Partner Scientific Board (PPSB), the Scientific Advisory Board (SAB) and the Resource Allocation Review Committee (RARC). He is responsible for NIA Progress Reports, non-competitive renewals, and competitive renewals. Dr. Weiner responds to many questions and inquiries concerning ADNI and he is passionate concerning the open data sharing of all ADNI data without embargo. Finally, Dr. Weiner is closely involved in writing abstracts and manuscripts and lectures at scientific meetings around the world concerning the progress and success of ADNI.

Resources
Informatics Core

Principal Investigator
Arthur W. Toga, Ph.D.
Laboratory of Neuro Imaging
University of Southern California
contact
The Informatics Core, based at the Laboratory of Neuro Imaging (LONI) at the University of Southern California, is responsible for de-identifying, archiving, and disseminating all clinical, biospecimen, genetic and imaging data including raw and processed MR and PET scans. All data are made available to approved ADNI investigators within days after the date of collection through the Image and Data Archive (IDA) website, which provides search and data exploration interfaces for evaluating and obtaining data of interest. The Informatics Core also distributes methods and software tools created and/or used by the ADNI analysts.

Arthur W. Toga is a Professor of Neurology at USC, director of the Mark and Mary Stevens Neuroimaging and Informatics Institute, founder and director of the Laboratory of Neuro Imaging (LONI), and the founding editor of the journal NeuroImage. Dr. Toga has career-long funding and distinguished publication record in the analysis, registration, and modeling of structural and functional images obtained from many species, including humans.

Resources

Further Informatics Core documents can be found on the Study Documents page.

Biomarker Core

Principal Investigator
John Q. Trojanowski, M.D., Ph.D.
University of Pennsylvania
contact

 

Principal Investigator
Leslie Shaw, Ph.D.
University of Pennsylvania
contact

 

The goals of the Biomarker Core, directed by John Trojanowski, M.D. and co-directed by Leslie Shaw, Ph.D. at the University of Pennsylvania, are to establish a bank of biological fluids from the unique cohort of subjects followed in ADNI and conduct studies of selected AD biomarkers:

  • CSF Aβ1-42, t-tau and p-tau181 for all ADNI1/GO/2 CSFs; A Aβ1-40 added to this analyte group for all CSFs collected in ADNI3.
  • These CSF analyses are done in partnership with Roche using Elecsys immunoassays on the fully automated Cobas e e601 analyzer
    • CSF Aβ1-42/1-40/1-38 analyses of all ADNI1/GO/2 CSFs by validated UPLC/tandem mass spectrometry
  • Analyses of plasma biomarkers in partnership with Roche is anticipated on the fully automated Cobas e601
  • A wide array of new candidate biomarkers analyzed by RARC-approved investigators in ADNI CSF, plasma or serum samples using novel immunoassays or HPLC/tandem mass spectrometry.
  • Studies in non-ADNI UPenn and collaborator AD and non-AD NGD with neuropathologic diagnoses that are of key interest to Biomarker Core PIs and relate to ADNI studies involving mixed pathology in AD subjects.
  • In support of harmonization of Aβ1-42 measurements we have participated in the development of mass spectrometry-based reference methodology and mass assignment of concentration values to the newly released Certified Reference Material for this key AD biomarker; in addition we are participating in studies of pre-analytical factors affecting CSF Aβ1-42 concentration and strategies to minimize these sources of variability.
References
  1. Shaw LM, Vanderstichele H, Knapik-Czajka M, Figurski M, Coart E, Blennow K, Soares H, Simon AJ, Lewczuk P, Dean RA, Siemers E, Potter W, Lee VM, Trojanowski JQ, Initiative AsDN. Qualification of the analytical and clinical performance of CSF biomarker analyses in ADNI. Acta Neuropathol 2011;121:597-609.
  2. Hansson O, Seibyl J, Stomrud E, Zetterberg H, Trojanowski JQ, Bittner T, Lifke V, Corradini V, Eichenlaub U, Batrla R, Buck K, Zink K, Rabe C, Blennow K, Shaw LM, for the Swedish BioFINDER study group and the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative. CSF biomarkers of Alzheimer’s disease concord with amyloid-β PET and predict clinical progression: A study of fully-automated immunoassays in BioFINDER and ADNI cohorts.  Alz Dement 2018; https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jalz.2018.01.010.
  3. Korecka M, Waligorska T, Figurski M, Toledo JB, Arnold SE, Grossman M, Trojanowski JQ, Shaw LM. Qualification of a surrogate matrix-based absolute quantification method for amyloid-beta42 in human cerebrospinal fluid using 2D UPLC-tandem mass spectrometry. J Alzheimers Dis 2014;41:441-51.
  4. Shi M, Tang L, Toleddo JB, Ginghina C, Wang H, Aro P, Jensen PH, Weintraub D, Chen-Plotkin AS, Irwin DJ, Grossman M, McCluskey L, Elman LB, Wolk DA, Lee EB, Shaw LM, Trojanowski JQ, Zhang J. Cerebrospinal fluid α-synuclein contributes to the differential diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease.  Alz Dement 2018, in press: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jalz.2018.02.015
  5. Irwin DJ, Xie SX, Coughlin D, Nevler N, Akhtar RS, McMillan CT, Lee EB, Wolk DA, Weintraub D, Chen-Plotkin A, Duda JE, Spindler M, Siderowf, Hurtig HI, Shaw LM, Grossman M, Trojanowski JQ. CSF tau and amyloid-β predict cerebral synucleinopathy in autopsied Lewy body disorders.  Neurology 2018; doi:10.1212/WNL.000000000000516.
  6. Kuhlmann J, Andreasson U, Pannee J, Bjerke M, Portelius E, Leinenback A, Bittner T, Korecka M, Jenkins RG, Vanderstichele H, Stoops E, Lewczuk P, Shaw LM, Zegers I, Schimmel H, Zetterberg H, Blennow K. on behalf of the IFCC Working Group on Standardization of CSF proteins (WG-CSF). CSF Aβ1-42 – an excellent but complicated Alzheimer’s biomarker – a route to standardization.  Clin Chim Acta 2017; 467:27-33.

John Q. Trojanowski obtained his MD/PhD in 1976 from Tufts University, completed his internal medicine internship at Mt. Auburn Hospital, and completed his pathology and neuropathology at Massachusetts General Hospital and the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, where he joined the faculty in 1981. He is Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Director of the NIA Alzheimer’s Disease Center, the NINDS Morris K. Udall Parkinson’s Disease Center, and the Institute on Aging. His research focuses on Alzheimer’s (AD) and Parkinson’s (PD) disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), frontotemporal degeneration (FTD) which led to the discovery of the major disease proteins in these disorders, i.e. tau, alpha-synuclein and TDP-43 proteins, and that aggregation of these pathological proteins is a common mechanism underlying these disorders thereby opening new avenues for drug discovery to treat these disorders. Dr. Trojanowski is among the top 10 most highly cited AD researchers from 1997 to 2007 with an h-index of 203.

Leslie M Shaw, PhD, directs the Biomarker Research Laboratory at the Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, in the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine.  He is PI and co-director of the ADNI Biomarker Core laboratory and co-leads the Biomarker Core of the UPenn ADCC.  He has published more than 280 scientific papers and reviews in the peer-reviewed literature.  Amongst the major interests of Dr Shaw are the development and validation of methods for quantification of CSF AD biomarkers including Aβ 42 and related Aβ peptides, t-tau and p-tau181 and new promising biomarkers in CSF and plasma for early disease detection, their predictive performance for AD disease progression and relationships to imaging biomarkers in AD and AD-related disorders.

Resources

Governance

ADNI is governed by a Steering Committee comprised of the PI, all Core leaders, PIs from each ADNI site, representatives of the NIH and FDA, and representatives of the companies contributing funding (observers only). Together with the Executive Committee and the Industry Scientific Advisory Board, these bodies ensure that the ADNI project adheres to the study design and methodology laid out in the grant submission.

 

Achieving the aims of the ADNI study would not be possible without the collaboration of hundreds of researchers, staff, industry advisors and research volunteers.

ADNI Organization

Select each for details

ADNI Data and Publications Committee

Robert C. Green, M.D., MPH – DPC Chair
contact

Erin Drake – DPC Coordinator
contact

The Data and Publications Committee (DPC) provides recommendations for sharing data from ADNI as well as policies for publication and publication credits for those who use ADNI data. The intent of these policies is to facilitate the sharing of data with all interested investigators, to encourage academic productivity, and to provide a mechanism for tracking and archiving data requests, intended analyses and publications related to and resulting from ADNI data. More information about DPC Policies can be found here. Questions may be emailed directly to the DPC Coordinator, Erin Drake.

Resource Allocation Review Committee

Tom Montine, Ph.D.
contact

The Resource Allocation Review Committee (RARC) is an independent group that reviews and processes requests for fluid and DNA samples collected from ADNI study participants. All interested researchers are required to apply for samples separately from the data.

Principal Investigators

Michael W. Weiner, M.D.
UCSF, NCIRE, VA
Principal Investigator

 

 

 

Paul Aisen, M.D.
University of Southern California
PI of Clinical Core

 

 

 

Laurel Beckett, Ph.D.
University of California, Davis
PI of Biostatistics Core

 

 

 

Robert Green
Brigham and Women’s Hospital
Data and Publications Committee (DPC) Chair

 

 

 

Clifford Jack, M.D.
Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota
PI of MRI Core

 

 

 

William Jagust, M.D.
University of California, Berkeley
PI of PET Core

 

 

 

John C. Morris, M.D.
Washington University
PI of Neuropathology Core

 

 

 

Ronald Petersen M.D., Ph.D.
Mayo Clinic
PI of Clinical Core

 

 

 

Andrew J. Saykin, Psy.D.
Indiana University
PI of Genetics Core

 

 

 

Leslie Shaw
University of Pennsylvania
PI of Biomarker Core

 

 

 

Arthur W. Toga, Ph.D.
University of Southern California
PI of Informatics Core

 

 

 

John Q. Trojanowski, M.D., Ph.D.
University of Pennsylvania
PI of Biomarker Core

Private Partner Scientific Board

The ADNI Private Partner Scientific Board (PPSB), convened by the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health, serves as a forum for open dialogue as it relates to the project’s progress and new trends in research and development within the field of Alzheimer’s disease. Please, direct questions about the PPSB (including membership inquiries) to Julie Wolf-Rodda or Michael Biarnes. Current PPSB partners include:

 

Abbvie

ACT-AD

Alector

Alzheimer’s Association

Araclon Biotech

BioClinica

Biogen Idec

Cogstate

Denali

Diamir

Eisai Inc.

Euroimmun

Eli Lilly and Company

GE Healthcare

Genentech

Janssen Alzheimer Immunotherapy

Lundbeck

Magou

Merck and Co.

PeopleBio

Pfizer, Inc.

Piramal Imaging

Roche

Saladax Biomedical

Servier

Takeda

 

ADNI PPSB Meetings take place annually in the Spring.

Executive Committee

The day-to-day operations of the initiative are directed by the Principal Investigator, Michael W. Weiner, and the Executive Committee, which consists of the PIs of the Coordination Center and Cores.

Steering Committee

ADNI is governed by a Steering Committee comprised of the PI, all Core leaders, representatives of the NIH and FDA, and representatives of the companies contributing funding (observers only). ADNI Steering Committee Meetings take place annually in the Spring. Get the presentations.

National Institute on Aging (NIA)

The National Institute on Aging (NIA), part of the National Institutes of Health, leads the federal government’s effort by conducting and supporting research on the biomedical, social, and behavioral issues of older people. The NIA provides information on age-related cognitive change and neurodegenerative disease specifically through the Alzheimer’s Disease Education and Referral (ADEAR) Center.

Funding

Data collection and sharing for this project was funded by the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI; National Institutes of Health Grant U19 AG024904).

ADNI is funded by:

 

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The grantee organization is the Northern California Institute for Research and Education (NCIRE), and the study is coordinated by the Alzheimer’s Therapeutic Research Institute (ATRI) at the University of Southern California. ADNI data are disseminated by the Laboratory of Neuro Imaging at the University of Southern California. This research was also supported by NIH grants P30 AG010129 and K01 AG030514.

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